Pharmacodynamic Systems with Delays Research Group

Mission

Biological systems that are targets for drug intervention are often exhibiting delay responses to treatment. Pharmacodynamic models describing such systems require specialized mathematical techniques and computational tools to adequately account for delays. Our mission is to foster to pharmacometric community mathematical fields of delay differential equations, distributed delays, and numerical methods of solving them, and to popularize their use in pharmacodynamic modeling.

Objectives

  • Research in the area of pharmacodynamic systems with delays.
  • Teaching concepts and modeling techniques addressing delays in PKPD.
  • Providing consulting services on applications of models with delays in pharmacometrics

Organization

The group is a not-for-profit organization that is part of the Center for PKPD Analysis in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. It consists of peers who volunteered to contribute to the group’s mission. The members may not be affiliated with the University at Buffalo.

Members

We welcome any scientist who wishes to contribute to our mission to join us.

Wojciech Krzyzanski, PhD, MA
Associate Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University at Buffalo
His research focuses on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of hematopoietic growth factors and pharmacometrics.

 

Gilbert Koch, PhD
Senior Research Fellow, Pediatric Pharmacology Group, University Children's Hospital, Basel, Switzerland
His research focus is on delay/lifespan modeling, anti-cancer effects in combination therapy, modeling in pediatric drug development and rare diseases, and target mediated drug disposition with drug-drug interaction.

Johannes Schropp, PhD
Professor at Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Konstanz, Germany
His research focuses on PK/PD modeling and numerics of dynamical systems.

Activities

Contact Us

Wojciech KrzyzanskiPhD, MA
Associate Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University at Buffalo
wk@buffalo.edu