Apothecary and Historical Exhibits

As part of the first and oldest public school of pharmacy in New York State, the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Museum of the University at Buffalo is an important component of education not only for the School's students, but also for alumni, the Western New York community, and visitors from throughout the world who have an interest in the earlier methods of pharmaceutical care.  

History

The Museum was created in 1986 to commemorate the centennial anniversary of the School.  In 1993, a turn-of-the-century "apothecary" was created to adjoin the Museum and further illustrate the practice of pharmacy in the US, focusing on the period between the late 1700s until the mid-1900s.  In the school's new building, Kapoor Hall, this education continues as the museum and was further opened to the public through a series of displays throughout its four floors.

The Apothecary and Exhibits also serve to preserve various artifacts from the history of pharmacy and the practice of medicine in Western New York and the surrounding areas.  These actions also support the effort to promote the field of pharmacy in the provision of health care.

Collection

 The focus of the Apothecary and Historical Exhibits highlights pharmaceutical care, primarily, but not limited to, Western New York.  Unique items which will provide education in this area are sought, particularly those which possess meaning to the history of the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences of the University at Buffalo and/or its alumni. Additional artifacts may be added based upon their relationship to the existing collection.

Reference

University and school historical reference questions are welcome, and should be addressed to the Apothecary Exhibits Director.

Contact Us

Apothecary and Historical Exhibits

Cindy Konovitz
Assistant Dean and Director
160 Kapoor Hall
716-645-3002

Individual and small group tours are available. We also can provide half-day educational tour sessions for classes and youth groups in conjunction with the Robert L. Brown History of Medicine Collection in the University at Buffalo’s Health Sciences Library and other health science museums and exhibits on campus.