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Electives List

The following is a list of approved electives for Pharmacy students including areas of interest (italicized) for assistance in choosing elective options.

Not all courses are offered every semester. See Graduate Class Schedule. Also, see Elective Policies for elective requirements and restrictions. Students are charged per credit hour for summer and winter courses.

To request approval to enroll in a course that is not in the list below, email pharm-advise@buffalo.edu.

Course Availability

Some courses may not be offered every year. See UB Graduate Academic Schedule for availability.

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SPPS Electives

FALL SPPS Elective Courses

P1

P2

P3

Course #

Class Title

Course Coordinator

Credits

 

 

X

PHC 500

Basic Drug Development

Nguyen, J.

2

Fellowship

Introductory graduate course on the fundamental concepts of drug formulation and development, including discussions of the crucial physicochemical and biopharmaceutical characteristics necessary for drug absorption.

 

 

X

PHC 508

Drug Delivery: Principles and Applications

Straubinger, R.

2

Fellowship

A study at the advanced level of the physical and biological principles which apply to the design, development, and evaluation of drug delivery systems. Specific examples of modern systems such as transdermal preparations, liposomes, implants, monoclonal antibodies, and those involving site-targeting will be discussed. Please note: this is a rigorous course that involves 3-5 scientific papers each week, participating in discussions in class, and writing a term paper.

 

 

X

PHC 509

Pharmacogenomics

Blanco, J.

2

Fellowship

Pharmacogenomics

This graduate level course covers the essential fundamentals of pharmacogenomics within the context of the pharmaceutical sciences. Emphasis is devoted to the application of pharmacogenomic principles and techniques to a) contemporary drug development practices, and b) drug treatments for major diseases.

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

 

 

X

PHC 539

Protein Pharmaceuticals

Balu-Iyer, S.

2

Fellowship

Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics (Pk/Pd)/Pharmacometrics                                                                       

The objective of the course is to introduce pharmaceutical issues associated with the development of protein drugs, in particular production, formulation, stability, protein characterization and analysis, Pharmacokinetics and dynamics, immunogenicity, protein delivery and next generation protein products.

X

X

X

PHC 560

LC/MS in Pharm Res

Qu, J.

2

Fellowship

The following philosophical points will be conveyed to students: 1. Analytical techniques are the eyes of scientific research; specifically, the quality of analytical work is highly important for quality PK/PD research; 2. The high sensitivity and selectivity of LC/MS makes it the most power tool in pharmaceutical and biological analysis, but that doesn’t mean it is simply the solution of all your analytical problems; consider the instruments as tools that are not yet perfect in scientific research and  consider analytical projects as researches; 3. Knowledge of separation and chromatography are much more important than the skill of ‘operating instruments’ in pharmaceutical and biological analysis; and 4. The historic milestones of LC and MS techniques provide an important perspective.

 

 

X

PHC 607

Intermediate Pharmacokinetics

Balthasar, J.

3

Fellowship

Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics (Pk/Pd)/Pharmacometics

This course covers classical and contemporary methods for the characterization of drug concentration data and for the evaluation of the kinetics of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. Students will learn how to develop conceptual PK models, construct series of differential equations to define PK models, and work with the method of Laplace Transformation to solve differential equations and to develop analytical solutions for PK metrics. The course focuses on basic PK concepts, but also introduces population PK analyses, clinical trial simulation, and pharmacodynamic modeling. Students will learn to utilize PK software including WinNonLin and ADAPT.

X

X

X

PHC 613

Pharmaceutics Seminar

Varies

1

Fellowship

Guidance in research.

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

X

X

X

PHC 615

Research

Varies

1-6

Any

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

 

X

X

PHM 521

Spanish for Pharmacists

Gutierrez, K.

2

Any

Basic conversational Spanish for professional pharmaceutical assessment and patient management.

 

X

X

PHM 525

Positron Emission Tomography

Sajjad, M.

2

Nuclear Science

This course will introduce students to the modalities used in molecular imaging. Four imaging modalities will be covered. Those are optical imaging, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Single Photon Imaging Technology (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). It is designed to introduce students to the basics of each modality.

 

 

X

PHM 536

Diabetes Management

Slazak, E.

3

Ambulatory Care

Obesity, Diabetes and Metabolic (Bariatric) Surgery

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a multidisciplinary foundation in the principles of diabetes management. The student will develop their knowledge and ability to assess, manage, educate and monitor patients with diabetes. The contributing faculty are outstanding educators and practitioners from the fields of pharmacy, nursing, medicine, behavioral psychology, dietetics, and exercise physiology. All of the course faculty have professional practices and help patients manage their diabetes. The course is internet-based and requires the students to be self-directed in learning. Students will be provided with a course outline and dates to which modules should be completed and attend discussion sessions every two weeks.

ONLINE COURSE. INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

 

 

X

PHM 540

Advanced Compounding

Reiman, A.

2

Community/Retail

Hospital Dispensing/Institutional

Students are introduced to contemporary compounding methods utilized in many of today’s institutional and community pharmacy practice settings. Students gain knowledge and hands-on experience in several prescription preparation exercises where advanced pharmaceutical compounding techniques and use of specialized equipment and instruments are employed. There are a total of ten lab exercises. Each exercise demonstrates an innovative pharmaceutical compound formulation and/or lab technique pursuant to the filling of a particular prescription or medication order. Students work alone or with a designated partner. The compounding lab is configured into 10 distinct workstations, each intended for the preparation of a different product. During a given lab session, each student/group is assigned to one of the stations. Each week, the student rotates to a different workstation until after 10 weeks all students have compounded 10 products. In preparation for weekly lab sessions, students are required to view (at home) a product-specific pre-recorded video lecture.

OFFERED IN BOTH SPRING AND FALL. INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

 

 

X

PHM 550

Pharmacy Leadership

Prescott, W.

1

Academia

Residency

The course is scheduled to meet for 2 hours every other week during the spring semester.  The primary goal of this course is to provide students identified as the future leaders of our profession with the tools necessary to develop their ability to effectively lead others, inside and outside their profession. Students will be assigned introductory readings in the areas of identifying one’s strengths, people skills / personalities, relationships / networking, team-building, professionalism, goal setting, mission and vision setting, and leadership skills.  Students keep a reflective journal for each reading, detailing: a mock scenario created by the student applicable to the reading; what they learned from the reading; the statement, passage or quote that was most profound to them; and an example detailing how they incorporated what they learned into their professional life.  Classroom discussions will be student led, facilitated by the course coordinator and/or guest speakers exemplifying the attributes of a leader, and will be based on the readings and mock scenario and reflective exercises. Note: Registration is limited to 12 students. Enrollment in this course must be pre-approved by the course coordinator (Dr. William Prescott). Preference will be given to students with current and previous leadership experience through participation in student pharmacy organizations.  In order to apply what is learned during this course to the profession of pharmacy, preference will also be given to students with pharmacy internship duties ongoing during the school year.

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

 

 

X

PHM 551

Clinical Research Methods

Ma, Qing

3

Fellowship

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a multidisciplinary foundation in the principles of Clinical Research and Clinical trials in patients. The student will develop their knowledge and ability to assess, manage, educate and monitor patients that are enrolled in studies to include writing a protocol and consent form, certification to conduct research in our local environment, monitoring adverse reactions and FDA reporting, and data collection and analysis.  Students will be expected to write a protocol, present the idea orally and complete online certification.  The contributing faculty are outstanding educators and practitioners from the fields of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Sciences, medicine, and behavioral psychology.   Most of the course faculty have professional practices and help patients often with new medications, and these are role models for students.  The class meets once a week in the very late afternoon, in order to facilitate schedules of off-site participants.

 

 

X

PHM 561

Global Health Outreach

Prescott, G.

1

Global Health

This course is designed to expose students to issues surrounding global health including what world interdependence means, considerations in treating non-communicable diseases in low-income countries, pharmacists’ role/servant leadership, concerns and regulations regarding medication use and acquisition outside the USA, and opportunities that exist for pharmacists in global health.  Students will also be exposed to possible opportunities to participate in global health outreach such as medical mission trips, advanced rotation experiences, and short-term trips.

X

X

X

PHM 598

Professional Problems

Various

1-6

Any

Independent study or research project.

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

 

 

X

PHM 607

Clinical Evaluation of New Drugs

Hong, I.

1

Drug Information

The course is intended to build on drug information skills introduced to students in the P2 year and prepare information for presentation to peers and pharmacists on newly approved drugs or drugs in the pipeline.

 

 

X

PHM 639

Advancing Community Topics

Daly, C.

2

Community/Retail

The role of a community pharmacist has shifted from product to clinical centric activities. It is now evolving where pharmacists in the community setting are providing more clinical care directly to patients as part of the encompassing patient centered, primary care focus team. Advanced Community Topics provides an overview of fundamental management, entrepreneurial, and clinical topics in today’s evolving community pharmacist role.
ONLINE COURSE. INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

 

X

X

PHM 798

Supervised Teaching

Various

1-3

Academia

Residency

Students must apply and be accepted to become a teaching assistant (TA). TA credits count as electives and students register for PHM 798 Supervised Teaching. There are about 85-90 TA's each year.

SPRING SPPS Elective Courses

P1

P2

P3

Course #

Class Title

Course Coordinator

Credits

 

 

X

PHC 506

Biometry in Phc Sci

Bies, R.

3

Fellowship

This course provides a broad overview of statistical approaches commonly used in the area of pharmaceutical research. In addition to learning the theoretical aspects of these approaches, students will gain hands-on experience applying these approaches to experimental data using a statistical software package used be researches in academia, government, and the pharmaceutical industry.

 

 

X

PHC 543

Molecular Genetic Methods

Blanco, J.

1

Fellowship

This course consists of lectures and laboratories designed to introduce the theory and basic tools used in molecular biology. The course goal is to give students hands-on experience with a number of the techniques used in molecular biology as they are applied in the pharmaceutical sciences. The lectures will provide much of the theory that underlies these techniques.

 

 

X

PHC 608

Advanced Pharmacokinetics

Mager, D.

3

Fellowship

Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics (Pk/Pd)/Pharmacometrics

The rigorous theoretical development and application of kinetics and related mathematical and computer techniques to the study of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion presented at an advanced level.

 

 

X

PHC 609

Advanced Pharmacodynamics

Jusko, W.

3

Fellowship

Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics (Pk/Pd)/Pharmacometrics

A survey of the theoretical basis, types of models, methods of data analysis, and diverse applications of modeling the time-course of pharmacologic responses.

 

 

X

PHC 610

Population Pk-Pd Modeling

Fiedler-Kelly, J. (even years)

Bies, Robert (odd years)

2

Fellowship

Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics (Pk/Pd)/Pharmacometrics

This course introduces population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling methods, including the use of state-of-the-art software and tools (in particular, NONMEM) to analyze PK and PD data.

X

X

X

PHC 614

Pharmaceutics Seminar

Varies

1

Fellowship

Guidance in research.

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

X

X

X

PHC 616

Research

Varies

1-6

Any

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

 

 

X

PHC 630

Drug Metabolism and Disposition

Morris, M.

3

Fellowship

A study of the metabolism and disposition of drugs and drug metabolites. Topics include in-depth discussions of Phase I and II biotransformation pathways, pharmacogenetics, biotransformation and toxicity, in vitro/in vivo techniques for evaluating drug metabolism and scale-up of drug metabolism data.

 

 

X

PHM 524

OTC Drugs

Albanese, N.

1

Ambulatory Care

Community/Retail

The course builds upon your knowledge of over-the-counter (OTC) medications and self-care techniques that were completed in Pharmaceutical Care 2 and Self-Care Therapeutics. This course will allow you to apply that information in a practical manner.

ONLINE COURSE

 

X

X

PHM 540

Advanced Compounding

Reiman, A.

2

Community/Retail

Hospital Dispensing/Institutional

Students are introduced to contemporary compounding methods utilized in many of today’s institutional and community pharmacy practice settings. Students gain knowledge and hands-on experience in several prescription preparation exercises where advanced pharmaceutical compounding techniques and use of specialized equipment and instruments are employed. There are a total of ten lab exercises. Each exercise demonstrates an innovative pharmaceutical compound formulation and/or lab technique pursuant to the filling of a particular prescription or medication order. Students work alone or with a designated partner. The compounding lab is configured into 10 distinct workstations, each intended for the preparation of a different product. During a given lab session, each student/group is assigned to one of the stations. Each week, the student rotates to a different workstation until after 10 weeks all students have compounded 10 products. In preparation for weekly lab sessions, students are required to view (at home) a product-specific pre-recorded video lecture.

OFFERED IN SPRING AND FALL. INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

 

 

X

PHM 552

Clinical Research Methods

Tsuji, B.

3

Fellowship

RESTRICTED TO CLINICAL RESEARCH PROGRAM STUDENTS.

 

 

X

PHM 553

Biometry in Pharmaceutical Sciences

 

3

Fellowship

CURRENTLY NOT OFFERED.

X

X

X

PHM 587

Radiopharmacy

Bednarczyk, E.

2

Nuclear Science

This course is a survey of radiopharmacy. It will cover the basic principles of radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine instrumentation, radiopharmaceutical and radiopharmacy design, selected radiopharmaceuticals, and some of the regulatory and safety issues that are involved with the use of radiopharmaceuticals in diagnosis and therapy. Students will also observe the operation of a centralized nuclear pharmacy and a clinical nuclear medicine department.

X

X

X

PHM 598

Professional Problems

Various

1-6

Any

Independent study or research project.

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

 

 

X

PHM 599

Teaching and Learning Theory

Woodruff, A.

1-2

Academia

Residency

The purpose of this elective is to give students interested in careers in academia the opportunity to learn about the basic theories and practices of teaching and learning. Readings and writing assignments focus on the concepts of pedagogy and andragogy, how learning objectives are created, in-class assessment techniques and Bloom’s taxonomy, and best practices for exam question construction.

 

X

X

PHM 638

Pharmacy Management II

Fiebelkorn, K.

2

Community/Retail

This course is designed to be a sequence to PHM 637, Pharmacy Management I. Pharmacy Management I, is a general pharmacy management course. This course would concentrate specifically on independent pharmacy and clinic ownership and the unique challenges in presenting patient care, owner's insights to about educational competencies needed and perceived barriers to pursuing pharmacy case studies along with interaction with outside practitioners both inside and outside the classroom. The course will have guest speakers and include outside class assignments, interviews, and tours of different independent pharmacies as well as discussions surrounding financing and practicality.

 

 

X

PHM 790

Topics in Psychiatry

Demler, T.

1

Psychiatry

The course builds upon your knowledge of psychiatric pharmacy practice that was discussed in PHM701. Review of the DSM 5 mental health conditions, medications used to treat, and other challenges of providing care in psychiatry will be included in this elective. The topics and ideas shared in this course will enable you to successfully manage psychiatric patient population in both the community and institutional setting. 

 

 

X

PHM 791

Pediatric Pharmacotherapy

Fusco, N.

1

Pediatrics

Pediatric pharmacotherapy is an elective course offered to third year professional pharmacy students. The course will cover the pathophysiology and therapeutics of various disease states encountered in the pediatric population. The course will also address challenges to providing pharmaceutical care to children, with a particular focus on selecting the appropriate drug, dosage, and route of administration. 

 

 

X

PHM 794

Advanced Ambulatory Pharmacotherapeutics

Gengo, F.

2

Ambulatory Care

Advanced Ambulatory Therapeutics is designed to teach and develop advanced problem-solving skills needed to be successful in the management of complex patients typically seen in outpatient settings. The course uses active and team-based learning principles to introduce advanced therapeutics issues. Students work in groups to develop written care plans and present them. The course focus is the development of detailed and evidence-based Medication Therapy Management (MTM) plans for complex patients and includes discussions related to therapeutic recommendations, therapeutic controversies, appropriate monitoring plans and schedules, and relevant literature to support all recommendations.

 

 

X

PHM 795

Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics

Pasko, M.

2

Hospital Dispensing/Institutional

Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics is designed to teach and develop advanced problem-solving skills needed to be successful in the management of complex patients typically seen in the inpatient and long-term care environment. The course uses active and team-based learning principles to introduce advanced therapeutics issues. Students work in groups to develop and present care plans for 6 cases over the course of the semester. The course focus is the development of detailed and evidence-based care plans for complex patients and includes discussions related to therapeutic recommendations, therapeutic controversies, appropriate monitoring plans and schedules, and relevant literature to support all recommendations.

 

X

X

PHM 798

Supervised Teaching

Various

Various

Academia

Residency

Students must apply and be accepted to become a teaching assistant (TA). TA credits count as electives and students register for PHM 798 Supervised Teaching. There are about 85-90 TA's each year. Students typically receive 1-2 credit hours.

Outside Electives

FALL Approved Outside Elective Courses

Note: A maximum of one course (up to 3 credits) of approved non-SPPS courses may count toward the professional electives requirement.

 

P1

P2

P3

Course #

Class Title

Course Coordinator

Credits

X

X

X

CHB 501

Study of Health Behavior

Leone, L.

3

Public Health

Examination of selected approaches for explaining people’s health-related behaviors (i.e., cultural, economic, social structure, social psychological), and a review of intervention strategies designed to modify health-related behaviors.

X

X

X

CHB 601

Principles of Community Health and Health Behavior

Orom, H.

3

Public Health

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive, doctoral-level overview of principles and theoretical perspectives on the determinants of health behavior and community health. Using a biopsychosocial perspective we will examine biological influences, psychological, social, and policy determinants of health behavior and health.

X

X

X

EEH 501

Epidemiology Principles

Lamonte, M.

4

Public Health

Introduction to the basic principles, methods and uses of epidemiology.

NOTE: ONLY 3 CREDITS COUNT TOWARDS ELECTIVE REQUIREMENT.

X

X

X

EEH 507

Intro to Health Care Org

Young, K.

3

Public Health

Introduces students to the historical development, structure, operation, and current and future directions of the major components of the American health care delivery system. It examines the ways in which health care services are organized and delivered, the influences that impact health care public policy decisions, factors that determine priorities in financing health care services and the relationship of health care costs to measurable benefits.  The course enables students to assess the role of organized efforts to influence health policy formulation, and the contributions of medical technology, research findings, and societal values to the evolving U.S health care delivery system. Class time is also devoted to exploring emerging policy, ethical and legal dilemmas resulting from medical and technological advances.

X

X

X

EEH 534

Global Health

Ram, P.

3

Global Health

X

X

X

LAI 648

Graduate Research Ethics

Shook, J.

3

Public Health

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the ethics of scientific research and broader moral responsibilities of science to the public. The requirements for the course include the satisfactory completion of online tutorials in human subjects research and the responsible conduct of research. This course will satisfy all Federal requirements for education and exposure of graduate and post-doctoral students. A number of case studies across a range of practical ethical issues will be analyzed and evaluated. Our aims will be to form reasoned responses along established guidelines to the ethical dilemmas typically met during scientific research. Topics to be covered include: theories of ethics, ethical conduct, research involving human subjects, research involving animals, scientific integrity, collaboration and trust, preventing fraud and plagiarism, professional standards for scientific publication, intellectual property, and competing interests. Human subject research is a central topic. This course will cover how to determine when human subject research is conducted, exempt research, obtaining informed consent, preparing research plans for IRBs, the roles of IRBs, the roles of HIPAA, and working with special populations.

*This course cannot be used as a substitution for the required PHM 729 Pharmacy Ethics course.

X

X

X

MHI 501

Intro Health Informatics I

Byrd, G.

3

Pharmacoinformatics

This course provides an overview of the history and current core research priorities of the medical/health informatics field. Major course topic areas will center on the challenges surrounding the implementation of electronic health records inpatient care settings and their use to help manage the health of large patient populations. These include the acquisition, storage, use and representation of medical data; data interchange standards; health information retrieval and knowledge management methods; protecting the privacy, confidentiality and security of medical data; patient information portals and personal health records; people and organizational issues; medical reasoning and probabilistic decision support methods; evidence-based medicine and guidelines; terminologies, ontologies, and data abstraction; patient population data management; and regional/national health information exchange systems.

X

X

X

NGC 518

Health Promotion and Epidemiologic Methods

Sands, J. and Winkelman, T.

3

Epidemiology

This course examines the health behaviors and health promotion needs of individuals, families, and populations. Epidemiologic approaches and evidence based strategies to promote positive health behaviors and to reduce health risks are discussed. Theoretical, developmental, sociocultural, and demographic factors for selected health promotion strategies are analyzed for use in formulating appropriate interventions to maximize health.

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY. OFTEN CLOSED TO NUR STUDENTS ONLY.

X

X

X

NTR 500

Energy/Protein Nutrition

Rideout, T.

3

Any

Covers sources, absorption, availability, metabolism and functions of major nutrients, i.e. carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids. The regulatory role of enzymes and hormones in absorption and metabolism of these nutrients will be examined. Methods used to estimate the requirements and Recommended Dietary Allowances for protein and energy will be discussed.

X

X

X

NTR 503

Nutrition and Health

Kuo, S.

3

Any

Discusses nutrition as an important element for maintaining optimal health. Emphasizes the importance of each nutrient based on its biochemical and physiological functions. Studies nutritional needs at specific stages in the life cycle, as well as the implication of nutrition in major health problems in the United States, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and cancer. Students learn to determine nutritional status through dietary analysis and learn to evaluate nutritional information.

X

X

X

PHM 522

Health for Refugee Populations

Gage-Bouchard, E.

3

Global Health

This course provides an introduction to health issues, barriers to care, and services for Western New York’s (WNY) refugee population. Through the course, students will explore major health issues impacting refugee communities, identify and prioritize major health issues and unmet needs for this underserved population, and identify, design or recommend a feasible service or intervention model to address the identified issue or issues. Major health issues that will be explored include physical, mental, sociological and spiritual health. Barriers that will be assessed include cultural, social, physical, and financial challenges. The course objectives will be met through faculty and student engagement with refugee community providers and client representatives.

CROSS-LISTED: CHB 522

X

X

X

PHM 692

Healthcare Fraud and Abuse

Truskiak, R.

3

Community/Retail

This course is intended to cover the health care fraud and abuse laws and issues relating to the prosecution and defense of alleged wrongdoing under federal and state health care systems. This course will provide a basic overview of the laws governing healthcare providers, such as hospitals, physicians and physician practices, medical device and pharmaceutical manufacturers, clinical laboratories and nursing homes. The course also will cover the criminal and civil prosecution and defense of actions against such entities and individuals and the essential features of the major statutes in this area of the law including the federal civil False Claims Act, the Stark Law, the federal Anti-kickback Statute and the remedies and civil and criminal penalties available to governmental entities and civil litigants. This course will address voluntary and mandatory fraud and abuse compliance strategies and the practical compliance issues faced by health care providers.

CROSS-LISTED: MGH 692

X

X

X

PHM 867

Law and Genetics

Braverman, I.

3

Pharmacoinformatics

Recent developments in genetics are calling into question existing regulatory regimes and policy approaches dealing with intellectual property, reproduction, disability, criminal law, health care, and privacy. This course will provide a unique opportunity to identify, explore, and debate cutting-edge legal, ethical, and political issues associated with new genetic technologies. Many researchers and administrators argue that it is too soon, and potentially too dangerous, to tinker with the human genome—and with genomes of other organisms—in a way that is passed down to future generations and that permanently alters ecosystems. The course will discuss the dilemmas currently facing scientists, ethicists, and policy-makers regarding the applications and continued development of biotechnologies. In addition to reading primary and secondary sources and watching relevant media excerpts, we will host scientists and social scholars and visit genetic and bioart labs. This is an interdisciplinary course accessible to a wide range of students. There are no science or law prerequisites.

CROSS-LISTED: LAW 867 LEC

X

X

X

PMR 515

Cancer Chemotherapy Princ

Huss, W.

4

Oncology

This course is designed for the biomedical graduate student or medical professional that is interested in the principles of cancer chemotherapy. Initial lectures are focused on the nature of the cancer cell, describing the genetic, biochemical and pathological changes in cancer. The essentials of pharmacology and toxicology are briefly described as tools used for the assessment of drug action. Following these introductory sessions the majority of the course is dedicated to reviewing the biochemistry, molecular pharmacology and therapeutic properties of the anticancer and chemopreventive agents. These include DNA reactive agents, antimetabolites, hormones, cytoskeletal poisons, chemopreventive agents, molecular targeted agents and biological response modifiers. The clinical uses of these therapeutic agents are given together with the basis for their use in combination (chemo)-therapies. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of the principles of drug action and the molecular mechanisms of each drug discussed. Examples of ongoing research programs are presented.

 

X

X

PMY 599

Supervised Teaching

Berman, H.

2

Academia

Residency

TA for PMY.

INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

X

X

X

PMY 605

Introduction to Bioethics

Berman, H.

1

Any

The School of Medicine and Biological Sciences announces a new course offering through the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Introduction to Bioethics. This course will employ short didactic lectures coupled with application to current and perennial questions in medical ethics. The reading material will be derived from textbooks and source materials available in medical and philosophy journals.

 

X

X

PMY 626

Toxicology Principles and Practices

Olson, James

2

Any

PMY 626 is designed to introduce students to the basic principles and practice of toxicology.  Chemical mutagenesis and carcinogenesis will also be included, with an emphasis on understanding mechanisms for these responses.  An Overview of risk assessment will include quantitative aspects of cancer and non-cancer based risk assessments.                   

 

X

X

PMY 627

Toxicology at Target Organs

Olson, James

2

Any

PMY 627 is organized based on a systemic approach to toxicology.  The adverse effects of several classes of chemicals will be investigated at specific target organs.  An emphasis will also be placed on understanding the mechanism(s) for the adverse responses of specific agents at a given target site. 

X

X

X

RPN 530

Oncology for Scientists I

Block, A.

4

Oncology

Defines the cancer cell morphologically, as well as molecularly, covering topics such as the cell cycle, cancer-associated genes, regulation of cancer cell expression, cancer genetics, carcinogenesis, metastasis, apoptosis, and laboratory research techniques.

X

X

X

STA 527

Intro Medical Statistics

Kuhlmann, D.

4

Any

This course is designed for students concerned with medical data. The material covered includes the design of clinical trials and epidemiological studies, data collection, summarizing and presenting data, probability, standard error, confidence intervals and significance tests, techniques of data analysis including multifactorial methods and the choice of statistical methods, problems of medical measurement and diagnosis, vital statistics and calculation of sample size. The design and analysis of medical research studies will be illustrated. MINITAB is used to perform some data analysis. Descriptive statistics, probability distributions, estimation, tests of hypothesis, categorical data, regression model, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods, and others will be discussed as time permits.

SPRING Approved Outside Elective Courses

Note: A maximum of one course (up to 3 credits) of approved non-SPPS courses may count toward the professional electives requirement.

P1

P2

P3

Course #

Class Title

Course Coordinator

Credits

X

X

X

EEH 502

Advanced Methodology

Bonner, M.

3

Public Health

X

X

X

EEH 537

Public Health Law: Legal and Ethical Perspectives

Wicher, C.

3

Public Health

Provides an understanding of how ethics and the law can assist in advancing a public health agenda. The class is interdisciplinary, including law students and students from public health related fields. The course will briefly examine the history of public health law, the tension between state and federal governments in the regulation of the public's health, and the conflicts between governmental powers and individual autonomy.  The course  will focus on practice of public health professionals to prevent disease and promote healthy behaviors in today’s changing health care environment, given current public health policy, regulatory enforcement and the wake of emerging public health challenges  such  as  disparities  in health  care, the Ebola crises, the bed bug crises, the obesity  epidemic,  immunizations and mandated health care insurance.

X

X

X

ES 564

Obesity

Various

3

Obesity, Diabetes and Metabolic (Bariatric) Surgery

X

X

X

MHI 502

Intro Health Informatics II

Byrd, G.

3

Public Health

This course provides an overview of the most significant areas of applied research and systems development and the challenges facing medical/health informatics professionals working to build and support such applications. Major course topic areas will include electronic health record systems; the distribution and integration of clinical information systems; evaluation methods for health information systems; clinical decision support systems; nursing, public health, dental and pharmacy information systems and issues; telemedicine and telehealth; imaging systems; and bioinformatics systems support. The course is taught using different adjunct faculty with expertise in each area of health informatics and includes field trips to several different healthcare and public health settings to learn about the systems in use in those settings.

X

X

X

PHM 502

Health Behavior Change

Giovino, G.

3

Public Health

Health Behavior Change is an overview of the health behaviors contributing most dramatically to increased morbidity and mortality in the United States. The course emphasizes public health interventions and strategies to promote healthy behaviors and discourage unhealthy behaviors. The course examines consequences, patterns, risk factors, and change/interventions for each behavior or problem. Behaviors are examined from multiples perspectives (e.g., individual, social, environmental) and with a systems perspective in mind, illuminating the interconnecting influences on behaviors. Health behaviors and behavior change interventions are presented in the context of current research and theory. The course also examines the role of health disparities, public health policy, current debate, health behavior theory and emerging research.

CROSS-LISTED: CHB 502

X

X

X

PHM 605

Community Health & Health Behavior Interventions

Various

3

Public Health

This course is a designed to give students an in-depth understanding of the state of the science in health behavior and community health interventions, including individual, family, community, and policy interventions. Students will be prepared to critically assess and apply strategies for individual and community health promotion. Students will be well-prepared to design a variety of health-related interventions and to critically evaluate intervention research.

CROSS-LISTED CHB 602

X

X

X

PHM 641

The Business of Healthcare

Zielinski, L.

3

Industry

Community/Retail

This course is designed to be an overview of the health care industry and a framing of the severe challenges facing leaders in the field. It will take a business approach to the issues presented, but will always juxtapose financial issues with value creation. It begins with a short look at classic economics, and why they do not always apply in health care. It will take an in-depth look at the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and the implications is has on all parts of the industry. It will follow with a review of each component of the industry: government, health plans, employers, providers, and suppliers. Each review will focus on the unique challenges leaders are facing in a dynamic, changing environment.

CROSS-LISTED: MGH 641

X

X

X

PHM 650

Applied Regression for Public Health

Przybyla, Sarahmona

3

Public Health

CROSS-LISTED: CHB 650

X

X

X

PHM 867

Law, Genetics, Society

Braverman, Irus

3

Pharmacogenomics

The seminar will expose students to the history of, and differences between, genetic engineering, gene modification, and gene editing, discussing current dilemmas facing policy makers regarding the applications and continued development of these technologies. In addition to reading primary and secondary sources and watching relevant media excerpts, we will host a range of scientists and social scholars and visit bioengineering and bioart labs. This seminar provides a unique opportunity to identify, explore, and debate cutting-edge legal, ethical, and political issues associated with new genetic technologies.

CROSS-LISTED: LAW 867 SEM

 

X

X

PMY 599

Supervised Teaching

Berman, H.

2

Academia

Residency

TA for PMY.

INSTUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY.

X

X

X

RPN 532

Oncology for Scientists II

Block, A.

4

Oncology

Builds upon the theoretical basis of the previous semester, covering the immune system, hormones, chemotherapy and drug development. A large part of the semester deals with the clinical and pathological description of various organ systems presented by Institute medical staff. Ancillary lectures on cancer epidemiology, prevention, statistics, bioinformatics, and clinical treatment (chemotherapy, diagnostic imaging, radiation therapy, photodynamic therapy) are also presented. The human dimensions of the disease are addressed by presentations on pain and the psychological aspects of cancer. The students will also have the opportunity to meet with patients and their treating physicians.

X

X

X

SW 554

Motivational Interviewing

Sobota, P.

3

Any

This course is organized primarily as a seminar that will highlight Motivational Interviewing (MI) approaches to help clients build commitment and reach a decision to change behavior. This course provides a forum for case presentation and discussion with an emphasis on discussing cases from student’s field placements and/or practice settings. Theories of behavioral change will be discussed, and the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of intentional behavior change will be highlighted as an integrative framework for understanding the process of behavior change. MI is an evidence-based practice for addictive behaviors, but applications of motivational interviewing have been extended to behavioral change in general, including social work, mental health, health promotion, general medical care, corrections, and community and organizational settings. In addition, the course will discuss MI’s application to practice with “mandated” clients.

X

X

X

SW 992

Neuropsychology for Healthcare Professionals

Various

3

Neurology

SUMMER Approved Outside Elective Courses

Note: A maximum of one course (up to 3 credits) of approved non-SPPS courses may count toward the professional electives requirement.

X

X

X

PHA 6963

Veterinary Pharmacy for Pharmacy Students

2

Community/Retail

ONLINE COURSE

http://cpe.pharmacy.ufl.edu/veterinary-pharmacy/  

X

X

X

SW 702

Motivational Interviewing for Client Behavior Change

Babiarz, M.

1

Any

This course is an introduction to the principles, strategies, and the spirit of the Motivational Interviewing (MI) approach to help clients build commitment and reach a decision to change problematic behaviors. The theoretical basis of MI lies in the construct of “ambivalence” and the conflict between indulgence and restraint that is so prevalent when clients consider behavior change. The difficulty in changing problematic behaviors is an occurrence that extends well beyond “addictive behaviors.” The immobilizing effects of ambivalence can be seen in many practice spheres. In addition, the course will discuss MI’s application to practice with “mandated” and “resistant” clients. This course will consist of critical discussion and practical application of the material.

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