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Required Course Descriptions

PHC 501 Pharmaceutical Chemistry

The course examines concepts relating to the chemical basis of drug action in order to make drug therapy decisions. The relationship between the biological target and the drug entity that produces a biological response requires an integrated knowledge of the drug target, the manner in which the drug interacts with the target and factors that provide the drug with a measure of specificity. 

PHC 517 Pharmacogenomics

This course consists of lectures and in class exercises designed to introduce the principles and concepts in pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine. The course goal is to give students an understanding of the principles of pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine, such that they can then apply these skills to patient care.

PHC 529 Pharmaceutical Calculations

Pharmacy Calculations is a class taken by incoming pharmaceutical sciences and pharmacy majors. The course provides the foundational knowledge that prepares students to take licensing examinations and to be efficient, effective and accurate practicing pharmacists in diverse practice settings. It develops competencies in techniques for identifying, analyzing and solving real-life pharmaceutical and pharmacy problems involving calculations. The material covered provides the prerequisite background for other courses such as Physical Pharmacy and Pharmacokinetics.

PHC 530 Physical Pharmacy

Physical chemical properties of drugs; theory and practice applicable to design and evaluation of drug dosage forms; principles of solubility, solution equilibria, chemical kinetics, heterogeneous systems, solids. 

PHC 531-PHC 532 Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics 1 and 2

A study of factors influencing the absorption, distribution, excretion and metabolism of drugs in man and the role these processes play in the therapeutic and adverse effects of drugs. Elementary compartmental modeling, mechanisms of drug absorption, mechanisms of renal clearance, and assessment of drug bioavailability. 

Pharmacotherapeutics

PHM 501 Foundations of Pharmacotherapeutics
PHM 601 Cardiovascular/Renal
PHM 602 Endocrinology & Women's Health
PHM 603 Immunology/Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapeutics
PHM 604 Ophthalmology/Dermatology/Nutrition/GI Pharmacotherapeutics
PHM 701 Neurology/Psychiatry/Substance Abuse Pharmacotherapeutics
PHM 702 Pulmonary/Toxicology/Rheumatology Pharmacotherapeutics
PHM 703 Oncology/Hematology Pharmacotherapeutics
PHM 704 Geriatrics/Pediatrics/Critical Care Pharmacotherapeutics

Pharmacotherapeutics (PT) consists of NINE courses that start in the spring of your first professional year and continues through your third professional year of the doctor of pharmacy Program (PharmD). Upon completion of this course sequence, you should be able to advance the level of clinical patient management through the understanding and utilization of pharmacotherapeutic principles. In your first professional year, the course is designed to give you a foundation related to the health care environment and orient you to the application of clinical laboratory data. Topics in the remaining courses in the second and third professional years may build upon one another (e.g. immunology before rheumatology) or not. 

PHM 503-PHM 504 Pathophysiology 1 and 2

The PHM 503 and 504 courses are designed to provide you with a basic understanding of pathophysiologic mechanisms of diseases and normal physiologic compensatory function. The emphasis is on bridging basic science to clinical practice through integrated understanding of molecular and functional alterations in cells, tissues, and organ systems of diseases. In your first semester, the course sequence will begin with general pathology at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels, followed by integrated organ system diseases by mid-first semester and throughout the second semester. A structured framework has been developed to include epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations of disease. 

PHM 505-PHM 506 Patient Assessment 1 and 2

These courses are designed to expose students to the process of patient assessment, so that future functions of the profession in the assessment arena are more easily developed, and so that a common database and understanding can be shared with other health care professionals. The overarching purpose is to provide students with the necessary tools to be capable of determining how specific diagnoses are achieved based on an assessment of subjective and objective data from the patient history, physical examination findings, laboratory parameters, and imaging findings; to assess data from a pharmacy perspective; and, to utilize this data in disease state management and triage.  

PHM 515 Pharmaceutical Care 1

Pharmaceutical Care 1 introduces the basic fundamentals of the pharmacy profession and practice to the first  professional year student (P1). The main ideas to be discussed in this course are counseling (patient interviewing and communication) and pharmacists’ documentation. 

PHM 516 Self-Care Therapeutics

Self-Care is defined as the independent act of preventing, diagnosing, and treating one’s own illnesses without seeking professional advice. This includes, but is not limited to, general care measures and nonprescription drugs. This course is designed to prepare future pharmacists to assess whether patients are candidates for self-care and to recommend appropriate self-care measures for commonly encountered self-manageable conditions. Please see UB Learns for the practicum schedule, as you only need attend your scheduled sections. 

PHM 530 Pharmacy Law

This course is intended to provide rote knowledge and understanding in all the laws, rules and regulations that pertain to the practice of pharmacy in New York State. The material presented should serve as the basis for your legal knowledge and practice over the life span of your career in pharmacy. As a pharmacist, you will apply the law every day in your practice.

PHM 555 All School

This is not an actual course, but a required seminar time for all professional pharmacy students to have available for events, which are announced throughout the semester.

PHM 600 US Health Care Systems

Social, political, economic and other factors have an enormous impact on the way that the US health care system is structured and; therefor, on the types of and manner by which care is delivered to patients.

“The health care system in the United States has been called ‘a paradox of excess and deprivation’. Some persons receive too little care because they are uninsured, inadequately insured, or have Medicaid coverage that many physicians will not accept.” (“Understanding Health Policy: A Clinical Approach, 6e” by Thomas Bodenheimer and Kevin Grumbach.)

This is a one credit-hour course which serves as an examination of U.S. health systems in which patient-centered and/or population-based care is provided, and how social, political, economic, organizational and cultural factors influence providers’ ability to ensure patient safety and deliver coordinated interprofessional care services. 

PHM 606 Biostatistics and Drug Literature Evaluation

The course builds on drug information retrieval skills first introduced to students in the first professional year coupled with drug literature evaluation.

PHM 615-PHM 616 Pharmaceutical Care 2 and 3

Pharmaceutical Care II is designed to emphasize patient-oriented pharmaceutical care skills. Class content is designed to run concurrently with the pharmacotherapeutics class and enhance or demonstrate concepts or skills designed for small groups. A variety of patient centered approaches, including writing notes to prescribers or other health care professionals and device counseling are used in this class. This class builds on some of the foundational knowledge of professional writing, communication, and diseases that were introduced in pharmaceutical care I & II. 

A continuation of the pharmaceutical care sequence with further emphasis on patient-oriented pharmaceutical care. Introduction of pharmacy informatics and disease state management.  Modules and patient cases will be used to reinforce learning of diseases covered in Pharmacotherapeutics. Monitoring and modifying patient care plans are studied with the goal of assuring positive outcomes. 

PHM 637 Contemporary Pharmacy Management and Practice

The changing health care environment requires that pharmacists practicing in all settings become efficient and effective purveyors of pharmaceutical care. Pharmacists command high salaries and as a consequence are expected to manage a pharmacy's resources to maximize the potential of the corporation's employees, finances, inventory, and time to achieve the desired health and economic outcomes. Changes in pharmacy scope of practice, health care laws and reduction in reimbursement have mandated that all pharmacists, supervisors and staff alike, be well versed in business management techniques. This course will cover all aspects of pharmacy business management including, but not limited to, accounting and finance; human resource management issues; inventory pricing and control; marketing and promotion; leadership; advocacy; Medicaid and Medicare; time management and investments. Students will learn to apply these skills to successfully operate a pharmacy practice encompassing independent, chain, and ambulatory and consultant fields.

PHM 651-PHM 652 Professional Practice Lecture and Laboratory 1 and 2

Practical application of drug dosage formulation, the storage, preparation, dispensing and compounding of medicines and the use of non-medications which include but are not limited to: solid and liquid dosage forms, intravenous admixtures, and devices. Emphasis is on application of pharmaceutical preparations, mathematical skills, pharmacy law, critical thinking, patient education/counseling and practitioner consultation. 

652 is a continuation of Professional Practice I with emphasis on more advanced product selection. In addition, drug and non-drug products include, but are not limited to: advanced intravenous therapy, pre-packing and unit dose, chemotherapy, total parenteral nutrition.  Emphasis is on patient education, counseling, practitioner consultations, as well as product incompatibilities, preparation, law, and critical thinking.

PHM 706 Informatics and Health Information Systems

This is a two-hour course designed for PharmD students scheduled to graduate in 2016 or later. It introduces the concepts and tools required to understand the use of informatics in pharmacy practice.  The field of health informatics includes the development, deployment, and use of hardware and software technologies to enhance patient care including improvements in efficiency and safety. Key items that will be discussed include software such as electronic medical records, computerized provider order entry/e-prescribing, and clinical decision support tools as well as hardware solutions such as robotic dispensing/picking, bar code medication administration, and automated dispensing cabinets.

PHM 715-PHM 716 Pharmaceutical Care 4 and 5

Pharmaceutical Care V was developed to continue to develop skills needed by pharmacists and pharmacy students preparing for APPE.  Topics included in this course were selected from surveys of faculty, preceptors, P4 students and alumni who were asked to list items that would be useful to students on APPE and new practitioners.  Two main themes will be encountered: (1) Identification, extraction and interpretation of data to be communicated to other health care practitioners and (2) Orientation to products often supplied by pharmacists to elderly patients (integrated with PHM 512 Pharmacotherapeutics Geriatrics section).

PHM 729 Pharmacy Ethics

Pharmacy is a profession that has undergone several dramatic changes over recent years. Standards of practice, changing health care systems and regulations along with changes in reimbursement have made health care challenging. Providing health care in this environment can pose many ethical situations and choices. Students need to know the legal and ethical ramifications of decisions they make to understand proper patient health care.

PHM 730 Topics in Pharmacy Law

Topics in Pharmacy Law is a continuation of legal topics related to the practice of pharmacy and the pharmacist’s role in patient care.  Special topics will be presented and discussed to enhance the student’s understanding of the legal parameters of practice.  A major focus will be on the latest changes in state and federal regulations and laws including but not limited to: electronic prescribing, the USP 800: Hazardous Drugs Handling, the Joint Commission on Health Care Organizations, Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010, the Affordable Care Act, the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (BPCIA) 2010, and current updates in New York State Pharmacy regulations.

PHM 736 Pharmacoeconomics and Pharmacoepidemiology

The student will gain insight into the concept, methodologies, and application of the science of pharmacoeconomics and its importance to pharmacy practice.  The goal is to explore how pharmacoeconomics impacts pharmacy, regardless of what type of healthcare setting the pharmacist practices in.

PMY 511-PMY 512 Principles of Pharmacology 1 and 2

Explores principles of drug action on biological systems, action mechanism of each agent class on specific organ systems, a review and extension of pertinent physiologic concepts of that system, chemical structure-drug activity relationships, sites of action, metabolic patterns of principal drugs, and therapeutic and toxicologic aspects. 

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPE's)

PHM 581: Intro Pharm Pract Exp 1a
PHM 582: Intro Pharm Pract Exp 1b
PHM 680: Intro Pharm Pract Exp 2
PHM 681: Intro Pharm Pract Exp 2a
PHM 682: Intro Pharm Pract Exp 2b
PHM 780: Intro Pharm Pract Exp 3
PHM 781: Intro Pharm Pract Exp 3a
PHM 782: Intro Pharm Pract Exp 3b

Level 1: Students complete a minimum of 50 hours throughout their first professional year. They will complete approximately 25 hours during the fall semester (PHM 581) and 25 hours during the spring semester (PHM 582) of both shadowing and community education activities (service-based learning). Students will be asked to observe pharmacy-related activities including but not limited to, patient and inter-professional interactions, dispensing techniques, formulating pharmaceutical preparations, patient counseling, drug delivery devices, medication therapy management, service learning, medication error prevention and reporting, pharmacoinformatics, and wellness clinics. All students will also participate in group reflection sessions, various professional training and related assignments, case studies, as well as creating an IPPE journal, in which they will continuously document and reflect on all experiences they complete throughout all levels of the IPPE course sequence. These experiences and related activities will continue to be integrated with the doctor of pharmacy curriculum to further enhance their clinical skills and contribute to their overall development as a pharmacy healthcare professional.

Level 2: Students complete a minimum of 100 hours throughout their second professional year. Students will be asked to perform and complete tasks including but not limited to, patient and inter-professional interactions, dispensing techniques, formulating pharmaceutical preparations, patient counseling, drug delivery devices, medication therapy management, service learning, medication error prevention and reporting, pharmacoinformatics, and wellness clinics. P2 students are now licensed pharmacy interns in NYS and can perform actual pharmacy practice activities under the supervision of a pharmacist. They will complete approximately 50 hours during the fall semester (PHM 681) and 50 hours during the spring semester (PHM 682). All students will also participate in group reflection sessions, various professional training and related assignments, case studies, as well as the continuation of documenting and reflecting on all experiences via their IPPE journal. These experiences and related activities will continue to be integrated with the doctor of pharmacy curriculum to further enhance their clinical skills and contribute to their overall development as a pharmacy healthcare professional.  

Level 3: Students complete a minimum of 150 hours throughout their third professional year. Students will be asked to perform and complete tasks including but not limited to: patient and inter-professional interactions, dispensing techniques, formulating pharmaceutical preparations, patient counseling, drug delivery devices, medication therapy management, service learning, medication error prevention and reporting, pharmacoinformatics, and wellness clinics. The theme of this particular course will be “mini-APPE” rotations, meaning it will attempt to mimic and directly prepare them for the full-time advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPE) which takes place the following year. A P3 student will complete three different rotations of approximately forty to fifty-five (40-55) each over the course of the summer, fall, and spring semesters. With the addition of assignments and projects that can take place both on and off-site, students will get an introductory exposure to what their fourth professional year will be like (completing advanced pharmacy practice experience full-time).  

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE)

PHM 820, PHM 821, PHM 823, PHM 824, PHM 831, PHC 815, PHM 841, and PHM 850

The advanced pharmacy practice experiences are designed to build on the previous academic base with a wide range of exposure to various clinical pharmacy practice environments and medical sub-specialty areas. Advanced pharmacy practice experiences are academic learning experiences in both patient care and non-patient care settings and are a vital component of the doctor of pharmacy program. The advanced pharmacy practice experiences involve the students in the provision of advanced clinical pharmacy services and provide experience in various medical sub-specialty environments. Major goals are the development of independent judgment and the integration of fundamental knowledge with clinical applications.

NOTE: The School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences reserves the right to change courses as needed in order to achieve curricular outcomes in accordance with Accreditation Standards and Guidelines.

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